These Are the Jump Starters That’ll Get You out of a Pickle

You can’t always count on the kindness of strangers.

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These Are the Jump Starters That’ll Get You out of a Pickle © These Are the Jump Starters That’ll Get You out of a Pickle

A jump-starter doesn't replace a battery charger. It also doesn't remove the need to replace your car battery from time to time. It is an incredibly handy tool, however, that might save you from calling roadside services or depending on the kindness of strangers. The first time you add one of these to your collection, you're going to feel almost like you've entered a cheat code due to the amount of time and frustration it'll save you. That is, as long as you pick the right model. Jump-starters are nothing new, and there are equally as many duds as there are home runs out there. Luckily, we have found several jump-starters that are worth your consideration.

Summary List

Best Overall: Noco Boost Plus GB40 

Best Value: Tacklife T8 

Honorable Mention: Audewdirect Portable Jump-Starter 

Best Compact: Micro-Start XP-3

Best Features for Its Size: Gooloo GP2000 2000 Amp Car Battery jump-starter

Best Charger: Schumacher SC1281 Smart Battery Charger

Best With Air Compressor: Stanley J5C09 Portable Power Station

Our Methodology

Quite a few factors influence the selection of jump-starters on our list. However, one thing that's been left off the table is commercial demand. While hunting for jump-starters, it was clear that most people aren't after something you might find in a professional shop. That's why there aren't heavy-duty options on the list or ones that jump multiple vehicles. Most of these are designed to keep in the vehicle with you for emergencies.

The research comes from a few different places. Some of these chargers were subjected to hands-on testing or are models our team has personal experience with. Otherwise, I made sure to stick to our usual research routine to ensure anything on this list is worthy of your time and money. 

Best Portable Jump-Starter Reviews & Recommendations

Our Verdict

The Noco Boost Plus GB40 is hard to beat for most car owners. It's priced just right and can easily jump-start common applications. However, the Tacklife T8 is a great way to go if you want to save money. 

Things to Consider When Buying a Jump-Starter 

It's always best to make an informed decision, especially when the item you're purchasing is designed to come to your aid in an emergency situation. Jump-starters aren't all the same, however. 

Types of Jump-Starters

Portable 

Every jump-starter on the list above is a portable unit. They feature an internal battery, so there is no need to depend on external power sources. They are generally sized with vehicle storage in mind, but motorcyclists may want to consider more compact models.

To say that portable models don't have flaws is untrue, though. The primary drawback is that they aren't doing you any favors if they aren't fully charged. It's common for the same kind of cold weather that kills your car battery to suck the life out of one of these units. Keep an eye on battery levels periodically to ensure you won't wind up with a dead jump pack.

Wheeled Units

There are no wheeled units on our list, but they are excellent tools. These models take up a considerable space in the shop, but they do many things that their portable counterparts generally cannot. It's also not out of the ordinary for these models to be far more powerful. 

Many wheeled units can charge batteries and run diagnostic tests as well as jump a dead battery. These are usually found in a commercial setting. However, they can be a worthwhile investment for someone who is more actively involved in DIY automotive repair. 

Pricing 

The average car owner should expect to pay $50-$150 for a jump-starter. It's important to be careful on the low end of that price range, as quality and performance are likely to suffer. As engine displacement increases, consumers must move to a more powerful, more expensive unit. Models designed to turn over engines in diesel trucks or classic cars usually live in the $250-$300 range. As power increases and features are added, the price will quickly increase. It's common to find professional models selling for $1,000 or more. 

FAQs 

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