Modern Cars Need More Quirks

More personality could help differentiate cars in boring segments.

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Modern Cars Need More Quirks ©Modern Cars Need More Quirks

The original Opel GT from the ’60s and ’70s, not the roadster from 2000s, didn’t have impressive power or incredible handling, so people kind of forget about it these days, but it was known for its beautiful styling and odd quirks. Features like the rolling pop-up headlights, the lack of a trunk, and the hood bump made it weird and cool, even it wasn’t the best performer. Though we don’t know how it would drive, the Opel GT Concept from 2016 followed the same formula.

  • Car: Opel GT Concept
  • Photog: Stellantis/Unknown

The GT Concept followed a classic small sports car definition. It has a long hood, a tucked-back cabin, rear-wheel drive, it weighed less than 2,200 pounds, and its turbocharged 1.0-liter three-cylinder made a claimed 143 horsepower. Still, its oddities are what make it a true GT. While the concept kept true to form and didn’t have a trunk, nobody uses pop-ups headlights anymore, so Opel had to create new character points for the concept.

The most glaring features are the red tires, which are a callback to the Opel Motoclub 500 motorcycle that had two red tires in 1928. Furthermore, the door opens around the front tires in an extremely unique way. Rather than cutting the door short at the front pillar, the door and the front quarter panel are one, which creates a cool hinged look that exposes the entire tire when the door is open. Blending the paint surfaces with the side windows is also a really random and cool feature that gives the car a svelte look.

Both the original GT and the Concept are memorable for their personality traits, and I think quirks like these could help separate new vehicles when they are all starting to look similar in shape and design. Modern cars need to be weirder.

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